News Article
November 29, 2011

BuildingRating.org: A Global Resource for Ranking Energy Performance

Energy Efficient BuildingWhen you buy a car, you know about how much fuel it will use – the window sticker shows the EPA miles-per-gallon rating. But it’s not the same when you buy or lease a commercial building: There is no publicly available, credible, universal energy performance measurement.



That is changing as cities, states and countries around the world make strides toward energy usage ratings and disclosure. Now, BuildingRating.org provides a one-stop online source for the latest updated information on energy rating programs, policies and analysis. The web site is a joint project of the Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).



There is progress toward ratings and disclosure in Europe, Australia, Canada and China. In the United States, cities like New York, Seattle, San Francisco and Portland (Ore.) and states including Washington, California and Massachusetts are creating policies and mandates for public disclosure of buildings’ energy consumption through benchmarking. BuildingRating.org provides an extensive, searchable library of policies, legislation, research, technical reports and more on rating and disclosing energy performance in buildings worldwide. Andrew Burr, director of the building energy rating program at IMT, says the site is valuable for policy-makers and energy efficiency advocates, as well as for parties such as real estate owners, facility managers and architects. “For example, a real estate manager could consult a U.S. map and see what the local policy is in Seattle or California,” says Burr. “They could read the policy, see rule-making documents, and search for items like compliance studies or reports from the local energy commission.”



BuildingRating.org is a useful stop for anyone following the trend toward energy performance ratings.



For information about New York City’s benchmarking program, the “Greener, Greater, Buildings Plan,” please see the Institute for Building Efficiency’s previous article: “The Big Apple Takes Bold Steps Toward Energy Efficiency in Buildings.”

November 2011